Idli Dosa Batter

Ever since I can remember, our family has been very big on South Indian breakfasts. Idlis, dosas and uthappams were an everyday thing and amongst the basics that I was taught to make. I hear a lot of people struggle with getting the batter right and I think once you get the proportions right, or start understanding how it works, it is fairly easy to do. Making this batter requires just a simple understanding of its nature, quite like with baking bread or cakes. Just knowing how the process works and what gives it it’s texture is all you need.

While my Mom has her own recipe for the batter, I now use a recipe that I’ve learnt from a lot of amazing women who have put it up on their blogs, namely – happyandharried, hebbarskitchen, vegrecipesofindia and kannammacooks. I shall try my best to help you with the process but please go and have a look at their blogs to get a better understanding.

While a lot depends on the temperature in which the fermentation happens, this is a basic ratio for the batter-

  • Idli rice – 1 cup
  • Urad dal – 1/2 cup
  • Fenugreek seeds – 1/2 tsp
  • Poha – 1/4 th cup ( This can also be substituted with cooked rice, although I have never tried doing it)
  • Salt –  to taste ( Please keep in mind that salt works to retard the fermentation, so salt it mildly if it is winter and well if it is summer. You can always add more salt as needed once the fermentation is complete)
  • Water – as needed ( Again, be careful of not over thinning the batter)

 

Wash the rice, dal and fenugreek well and soak all the separately, overnight. The next morning soak the poha for 5 minutes. Grind everything separately again. The dal in particular needs to ground very well and for long.

Alternatively, you can soak the rice and poha together and the dal and fenugreek together before grinding them up.

In both the cases, take care to not add too much water to the mix.

Add salt, as required, and mix well with your clean hands. Leave to rise overnight either on the kitchen counter or in a warm (but switched off) oven, if you live in a cold climate.

Make sure you leave at least half of the container empty so the batter can ferment and rise overnight without spillage.

Ideally the idlis are made the first day, dosas follow and uthappams at the end. Take care not to mix the batter too much as you scoop up the froth at the top to make idlis.

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I make the dosas on a cast iron tawa that that has been seasoned painstakingly and is something I am extremely proud of. The batter will of course need to be thinned to spreading consistency and salted to taste.

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Uthappams are made when the batter has soured a little and you can see the beautiful little holes form all over the pancake. We love our onion podi and onion capsicum podi version and this is our ideal Sunday breakfast.

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Hope this inspires you to give making your own batter a try. Let me know how it goes for you and I shall try my best to help you with any questions you might have! Happy Breakfasting!

The surreal sunsets of Kanyakumari

 

The next stop for us was Kanyakumari. This place stole our hearts in a way that has us craving for a repeat visit. And this even before we had left. We started the day with a visit to the Thiruvalluvar statue and the Vivekananda Rock Memorial. The entire thing was done in such an orderly manner, given the teeming crowds that they had, that it made us wonder at the endless queues and jams we get back home in the cities for almost everything. Once you buy the tickets, you join the queue and wait your turn to get onto a jetty that takes you to both the islands. The breeze and the beautifully coloured greenish blue ocean is sure to take your breath away.

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We had just the two days in Kanyakumari and regretted our short stay the very first evening. The windows looked right over the sea and we could tell we had a spectacular sunset awaiting us the very evening we checked in. As we left our resort and walked towards the beach, we were waylaid by the sight and smell of bhajiya’s being fried right in the open. The absolutely charming and beautiful mother-daughter duo ladling out the goodies, were absolute sweethearts and gave us a couple of freebies too. Language is really not a barrier when you’re travelling, we barely spoke and yet I doubt any of us would ever forget them. Our evening was spent taking in the most spectacular sunset of our lives till date. The beach is a short walk from the hotel and we stayed out watching the colours till the last trace vanished. This is one of those things that you must do once in your life if not more. I find it hard to believe a more beautiful sunset is possible anywhere.

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Our hotel was the Sparsa Resort. The property is beautiful and has efficient staff who make your stay as comfortable as they can. Could not find any faults with the place given the rates they charge. Complete value for money and pretty good food. We  have had our Karwachauth vrat happen on quite a few of our trips every year and this hotel hosted us during the karwachauth of ’14. Since the both of us fast on this day, not religious but sentimental, almost all the hotels we stay have had staff that go to such lengths to make us juices and make sure we eat well at night. Not to mention the “aw, so cute” looks and comments we keep getting. These guys were the same and we were bestowed with beaming smiles all day.

We left but not without witnessing two of the most gorgeous sunsets of our lives and a wish to visit again and stay on to see a few more.

 

The pristine beaches of Varkala

Varkala was a much looked forward to destination for the both of us. We are your typical beach bums and had read so much about the powdery soft sands and clear waters. We reached the sleepy little town pretty late in the afternoon and after a quick stop at our hotel headed down to the beach while the rest of the family stayed back to get over the travel fatigue.

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The hotel we were at was the Deshadan again. Apart from the absolutely heartwarming service we received from the staff, the hotel itself left a bad taste. They really need to refurbish the place. We had a humongous spider visit one of the rooms and mosquitoes were in plenty even after the staff took pains to light “kachua” in and outside our rooms everyday. The property itself is beautiful and with such excellent staff, it’s a shame nobody is putting in more time and effort to better the place. As we were leaving, the manager offered to give us his bike keys to go down to the beach to ensure we got back safely. Varkala, being a small town, most places concerned about the safety of their guests prefer you back before dark. It was a short walk down, and we did not take him up on the offer but it did tell us so much about how much of himself the guy put in his work. Lesson in it for all of us. Almost all places we visit leave us with such fond memories of not only the places and the food, but the people. Makes you believe in the goodness that makes the world go round.

As we neared the beach, we saw a lot of hotels at the edge of the cliff and we would try to get a place in one of these if visiting again. The views must be breathtaking. High tide had rendered the paapnasam beach inaccessible and we had to make do with the black beach. The difference in both being, The paapnasam beach is usually thick with tourists, both indian and foreign, as the temple is right on the beach. The idea being to wash away your sins after a dip in the waters. Maybe the guy above just knew we had not committed enough to wash them away ;).

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The way to the black beach, which stays underwater for most parts and is visible only when the other one goes under water, is either by climbing down a winding flight of stairs, which seemed way too mossy and slimy to be safely walked upon, or by climbing over the black boulders that flank the beach. As we got down, and it is fairly easy to do even for people who have a tendency to fall like moi, we felt our feet sink into lusciously thick and soft sand. The waters are beautiful and compared to the other beaches, pretty clean. A lot of the people seemed to be into yoga and beach sports, surfing et al. The shacks on top of the cliff , Cafe Del Mar and Trattoria’s, remind you instantly of some beautiful places you’ve been to in Goa. Varkala itself does the same, like a quieter, less crowded Goa.

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The endless tea gardens of Munnar

On our trips to the rolling hills and beautiful plantations of Munnar, we always make multiple halts along the way. Either it is the bewitching sights begging us to take pictures or some absolutely enticing food stalls. Along with the plantations, the elephant rides are also just outside the main town and you need to make a stopover if you want to experience the joyride. Not to be missed if you’re a fan of all beings four-legged like yours truly.

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Being as it is, situated at an elevation higher than quite a few in our country, the joy of sipping on a cup of cardamom chai, smelling the eucalyptus and pine trees along the way is to be experienced. We have walked in beautiful plantations, had passion fruits fall in our laps from trees and tasted the almost watery, yet so flavourful burst of fresh cardamom picked off plants in front of our eyes. We don’t think we can do justice to the wonderful local food we have encountered while we’re talking about our staycations and will talk about the culinary adventures of each destination in a separate post. 

On our earlier visit we had chosen to stay at Blackberry hills, this unfortunately, was not to be. There was some rioting in the town the day we reached, friction between the local and tourist cab drivers and our man of the hour – Danny, wonderful as he was, was not very keen to go on ahead and asked if we would be willing for a change in plans. We then proceeded to the Sienna Village. All our trepidation was cast aside when we had a look at the property and our cottage. Everything from the breakfast to the romantic candle lit dinner they arranged for us was pretty good.

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The trip that we took last year, had us staying at the Ambady Estate. The place, though a little difficult to locate, stole our hearts the moment we got down from our tempo traveller. With such picturesque cottages, the completely private plantation and birds calling out to you, it is very difficult to leave even for day trips. We were welcomed with a herbal tea, and the manager was kind enough to share the recipe with us. They have an old cardamom drying facility that he took us to get a look at. Warning : Go up to the attic like space only if you are comfortable climbing up seriously old stairs and not claustrophobic. The cardamom needs a lot of dry heat to lose all the moisture and hence the breathing issues once you’re inside. Out of the seven of us, just the two daredevils that we are, ventured up. The dining area is right next to the cottage they use as a reception and the food is scrumptious to say the least. The family that owns the property lives on it, along with their wonderful staff. The owner was friendly enough to enquire about our stay almost everytime we ran into him inspite of the manager being on his toes all the time.

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This property charmed us so much, almost felt like leaving home when our stay was over. p.s They sell the organic cardamom they make. Be sure to get a packet or ten, like we did.

Among the things to do while in Munnar would be, a visit to the Rajamalai National Park, something we missed doing on both our trips even after hours of waiting in line. It’s almost like the Zara store has announced a pick anything for free promotion in Mumbai. The kalaripayattu or the kathakali shows, suit yourself, we being a family of adrenaline junkies, chose the former and renewed our resolve to get fitter after we had been suitably chastened by their feats.

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The natural or manmade beauties at the Matupetty Dam, Top station and the tea gardens. The freshly cut pineapple they sell everywhere, inexplicably, tastes better in Munnar than anywhere else. A well guided tour of the plantations is also something we enjoyed. The guides do tend to get carried away while they take pictures and you might find yourself strugging to contain your laughter as you humour them and take the most awkward poses. Almost all plantations have shops near the main entrance and hold a treasure trove of spices, oils, tea, coffee, sandal and what not. The Kolukkumalai tea estate was a favourite with us on both the trips. Just a word of caution, this being the highest place in the world for organically grown tea, the ride is pretty bumpy and not for the faint of heart or full of stomach. Eat light and please avoid this if you have any serious health problems. Once you reach, it is quite a delight to the sense. The cool, misty air and the wonderful, soul soothing tea that you can have, is sure to leave snapshot memories.

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The one thing I absolutely love in Kerala are the freshly fried, salted yellow banana chips. You cannot imagine what popping a crisp and hot banana chip, straight out of the kadhai, feels like. Life changing. Go already.

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And so the adventure begins…

IMG_1500God’s own country – We have visited this beautiful, lush state twice in our travels and have returned equally charmed both the times. The first time would be on our honeymoon and well, we would have loved any other place just as much I suppose. Pretty hard to dampen spirits of a pair that has gone through the rigours to be together. The next time was when we took la familia to the place to get them a taste of what they had been craving for since they saw our pictures.

Kerala has, not only an inherent natural beauty, but a wonderful diversity and the most charming, ever smiling locals. Hills, plains, beaches, lakes, cities, villages, forests, there is nothing that you would miss experiencing in this coastal state.

The main cities are all well connected by flights with the rest of the country and almost all the locals understand and speak english. The food in particular is impossibly fresh and delicious. Eating local is always the best way to travel according to us and the fresh produce makes the bounty you can savour, limitless in Kerala. From the delightfully salty, fresh out of the oil banana chips to the passion fruit off the orchards in munnar, from the spice plantations to the freshly made kerala thali on the houseboats, we could go on and on about the deliciousness we encountered on our trips.

IMG_0355 1The places we covered during out sojourns were varied, from the towns of Kochi and Trivandrum to the beautiful backwaters of Alleppey. From the lush hills of Munnar to the beaches of Varkala. We even ventured into the neighbouring state of Tamil Nadu during our second visit and took in the surprisingly beautiful sunsets of Kanyakumari.

The following posts shall guide you through planning a trip with references to the hotels we stayed at and the operators who helped us organise it all. [This is not a sponsored post and we do not gain monetarily or in any way from it]. We hope it helps you plan a beautiful vacation with your loved ones with some local know-how.

Let’s get tripping 😉